Djokovic Avenges U.S. Open Loss to Murray With Win in Shanghai Finals

Novak Djokovic saved five match points as he edged two-time defending Shanghai Rolex Masters champion Andy Murray 5-7, 7-6(11), 6-3 in three-plus hours
Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg
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Novak Djokovic saved five match points as he edged two-time defending Shanghai Rolex Masters champion Andy Murray 5-7, 7-6(11), 6-3 in three-plus hours. Since losing to Murray in the 2012 U.S. Open final, Djokovic has compiled a perfect 10-0 record, winning back-to-back titles at the China Open in Beijing and now in Shanghai. Djokovic has an ATP World Tour-leading 70 match wins this year, clinching his seventh different ATP World Tour Masters 1000 title and 13th overall. He has reached six Masters 1000 finals this season, adding to his victories in Shanghai, Toronto and Miami with runner-up showings at the Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters, the Internazionali BNL d’Italia in Rome and the Western & Southern Open in Cincinnati.

"I'm trying to focus now on the end of the season," said Djokovic. "I need to play well indoors. I need to try to stay consistent with my results and eventually get a shot at number one in the world. It's my biggest objective in this moment. It's something I'm aiming for. Obviously this is going to be a huge confidence boost and is going to help me in the race for number one. As I said, it's still not done. I still have to play well indoors."

"It was a disappointing one to lose," said Murray. "I've lost tougher matches than that before in the biggest events. So I'm sure I'll recover from it pretty well."

Both players struggled to hold serve early, trading breaks three times, and were tied 4-4 in the first set. When Djokovic was broken for the fourth time in the 11th game, he lost his cool and shattered his racket by smashing it into the ground before slinging it disgustedly toward his sideline chair.

''We are professional tennis players and we're big rivals, but in the end we're humans. We shouldn't be ashamed of our emotions,'' Djokovic said. ''I don't see anything bad in showing your emotions—positive, negative emotions. We can't just be flat-faced throughout the whole match.''