July 1, 2009
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff
Using The 1/3 Rule for drilling and competing: Competition allows you to work on shot selection, tenacity and focus. Drilling allows you to concentrate on pure execution of a particular skill (volley, serve, approach shot, etc.). Both drilling and competing are necessary to improve your game.
July 1, 2009
By Carl Barnett

Through my years as a tennis professional, I have found a bounty of benefits in pairing a student's private lessons and group work with tennis specific physical training. After what we've seen over the last decade in professional tennis, its effectiveness should come as no surprise.

July 1, 2009
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff
For those who think being a tennis coach is easy … think again! Being a tennis coach is a full-time job in which, on top of the obvious time spent practicing, there are countless additional hours spent with parents and college coaches. Then, of course, there’s also the tournaments and travel. One coach who takes these responsibilities very seriously is Mike Kossoff.
July 1, 2009
By Happy Bhalla
Conventional wisdom amongst many coaches and players suggests that the key to mental “toughness” is to talk and think positively at all times; especially when it comes to match play. While this seems to make sense at first glance, let us examine and explore a little beneath the surface.
July 1, 2009
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff
Robert Glickman, a USPTA pro for the last 30 years on Long Island, recently took his lessons on the road to Sans Souci Resort in Jamaica.
May 9, 2009
By Carl Barnett
Pros use a simple method to volley the ball. You can do the same. This is not diving or figure skating, so additional points are not gained for degree of difficulty.
May 1, 2009
By Edward Wolfarth
I cannot figure out why some of my students just don’t get it. I’m telling them everything I know, I’m trying different images and drills and they still do not seem to improve. One day on the other court, I was observing a fellow teaching pro giving a lesson. In a half-hour time span, he said very little. As a matter of fact, he didn't say anything technical or noteworthy. “Good shot, way to go, that's not it,” seemed to be his repertoire, but the student was still improving at a rate not much different than my student … what’s up? Certainly, I give my students feedback as well. After many years of trying different teaching techniques, I’ve come to the conclusion that there is little that can be taught but much that can be learned through self-discovery. And that’s the gist of it! I’ve evolved in to a “learning facilitator.” This may seem nothing more than a connotation distinction, but definitively, an important one.
May 1, 2009
By Steven Kaplan

While there are many ways to perform successful tennis hitting movements, there are underlying commonalities that unify and define them all. I would call these universal stroke production characteristics “fundamentals.” These fundamentals are based on the static and immutable laws of physics, mechanics, kinesiology and motor learning. If your strokes adhere to the demands of the aforementioned principals, you are likely to succeed. There are also variations that occur in the production of movements. They involve a different way to achieve the same important goal. I would call these variations “style.”

March 1, 2009
By Jared Rada

Are pee wee tennis players better athletes than pee wee football players? Are they stronger then soccer and basketball players?

March 1, 2009
By Edward Wolfarth

Multi-tasking (MT) is now the mantra of our generation. It is indiscriminately accepted not only in colloquial conversation, but among astute teachers and scholars. It is empowering. According to this widely-held axiom, our students can and do learn efficiently doing several things at once. Our younger (and perhaps hipper) students brag about their prowess at juggling many tasks at once, while us older folk bemoan our inability to master this mind-muddling aptitude … MT. After all, who can't walk and chew gum at the same time?

March 1, 2009
By Steven Kaplan

The ancient Roman playwright, Terence wrote: “Moderation in all things.” He could have been referring to optimum tennis performance. Often, I hear both players and instructors repeating phrases of tennis wisdom that, while partially true when applied in the right context, can be undermining of performance when misused. I will address three of these erroneous clichés here.