June 14, 2010
By Salomon Levy Bromet
Whenever I step on to the court to teach a lesson, I ask myself three things: (1) Who am I teaching? (2) What am I teaching? (3) How am I going to teach it?
June 9, 2010
By Lonnie Mitchel
One of my first tennis instructors when I first began taking lessons in the late 1960s-1970s taught me something I will never forget. I preach this message to this day to many of my students, as well as my own two boys who compete in college and the USTA Junior Circuit: “Just let your racquet do the talking for you.”
June 2, 2010
By Carl Barnett
It’s early summer morning and you’re about to take the kids to tennis camp. They may not be hungry now, but it’s time to eat. Half a bagel or a bowl of cereal will do it if they are picky eaters. Just don’t let them go to work on an empty tank.
June 2, 2010
By Steven Kaplan
In 1971, Larry Linett, a tenacious baseliner from Albany, N.Y., was ranked number one in the East in the Boy's 12-and-Under Division. A talented lefty from Douglaston, N.Y., John McEnroe was ranked number eight, in that same age group.
May 26, 2010
By Nancy Gill McShea
Daniel B. Dwyer, a managing partner at the Point Set Indoor Racquet Club in Oceanside, N.Y., and a past president of the USTA Eastern section, died suddenly of a heart attack on May 25. He is survived by his daughter Kimberly, son Shawn and three grandchildren.
May 13, 2010
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff
The 2010 Annual USPTA Eastern Conference is set for Monday-Tuesday, May 17-18, 2010 and it will be hosted at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Queens. The two-day event brings together some of the sport's top professionals, who will be on hand to discuss the sport and deliver presentations on improving your game, to committee meetings, to networking receptions.
May 4, 2010
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff
On Saturday May 15th, the USPTA along with the USTA/Eastern/Long Island Region and the Nassau County Department of Parks is proud to offer Nassau County residents free tennis lessons at Love on Long Island in East Meadow! This exciting day on the courts will be held from noon to 3:00 p.m. at Eisenhower Park in East Meadow, N.Y. at Parking Lot #2.
April 27, 2010
By Branislav Grujic
The principal of physiology, or physical fitness, is the ability to meet the physical demands of a sport to perform optimally. Physical training is a disciplined routine of specialized procedures that are performed by players to condition their bodies for the purpose of improving performance.
April 8, 2010
By Branislav Grujic
Sports science is a lifeline to the future of the tennis profession. The expanded knowledge and expertise that can be learned from every aspect of the sport science industry is the defining evaluation of the ever-changing market.
April 7, 2010
By Salomon Levy Bromet
Most matches are not lost at match point. The complexity of the game is such that, in a tennis tournament, for example, a Grand Slam where the draw is of 128 players, there is only one winner and 127 losers. Those losers lost their matches for different reasons. Let us find out why by defining different types of players.
April 5, 2010
By Edward Wolfarth
Who doesn't remember that one teacher who had a real positive affect on our lives. It could have been a kindergarten teacher, a high school history teacher, a college professor or, yes, even a tennis coach.
March 29, 2010
By Rick Liebman
Here are some tried and true tips I have been using as part of my teaching for 35-plus years …
March 24, 2010
By Steven Kaplan
As a tennis instructor, my role is to give my students information and organizational structure to provide clarity and focus. The most serious players require more than a tennis instructor, however, they need a coach. While coaches provide instruction, they assume other, more ambitious tasks as well.
March 16, 2010
By Branislav Grujic
Psychological skill training is based on fundamental assumption; athletes try to do the best they can given their physical limitations and learning history, and they try to respond as effectively as possible in every situation.
March 2, 2010
By Branislav Grujic
Tennis development is a natural consequence of biomechanics. Biomechanics, stated simply, can be defined as the study of human motion in its physical entirety. It involves efficiency of movement and effectiveness in performing at the highest level, i.e., (by hitting the serve harder, or the approach shot deeper). To understand how your players develop coordinated skills, control, consistency, placement and power, it is important to consider the idea of a linked system of body segments.
February 16, 2010
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff
The Long Island tennis community is blessed to have some of the best indoor facilities and best coaches in the world right here in our backyard. Recently, Long Island Tennis Magazine spoke with some of these top coaches to get insight into their coaching/training strategies, what they look for in a great player, views on important local tennis topics, and a background in how they got into coaching. Even the best coach can always learn an extra tip or two, and the following article will provide all players and coaches with a chance to learn from the best.
January 1, 2010
By Carl Barnett
Have you ever had a complete meltdown? I mean, the type where you forget who is there, what was said, and basically, even forget many of the details of what has happened. By now, the entire world saw Serena Williams’ episode with the line judge at the U.S. Open women’s semifinal on Sept. 12.
January 1, 2010
By Steven Kaplan

While tennis coaches work from a similar body of knowledge, they tend to differ in how they prioritize and apply teaching methods, and philosophy. If a coach’s values compliment and reinforce a player’s values and the outlook of the player’s parents, then the relationship is probably a good fit. This month, I will address a narrow, but vital, coaching topic—learning. I have tried to simplify this complex area, by offering here, the headlines of my 20 favorite concepts on learning.

November 4, 2009
By Edward Wolfarth
Because I’ve put myself in an uncomfortable position utilizing a skill I'm not particularly good at, my expectations are commensurately less. I can easily rationalize my mistakes, but more importantly, I get to practice a weaker stroke
November 1, 2009
By Parsa Samii

As long as there has been sport, there has been coaching. Coaching is an occupation that requires several specific qualities that continue to evolve as a sport, and in this particular case, tennis, continue to change year after year. A great coach must be passionate, direct, knowledgeable, sincere, disciplined, motivational, and most importantly, trustworthy.

November 1, 2009
By Alanna Broderick
Over the past couple of years, I have noticed that a lot of my fellow tennis players against whom I competed are still involved in tennis in some form or another. Either, they are coaching at a university, working for a tennis club or coaching part-time somewhere.
September 20, 2009
By Steve Hu
Many junior players have powerful strokes in practice, but they can hardly bring them out effectively in real matches. One common reason is that they tend to take a brief “mental and/or physical break” after a good shot. They wait to see whether the ball is coming back, where it is coming, then start running. That often leads little or no time to set up, thus unable to bring out the lethal shots they “would have owned” when the coach feeds the balls from the basket.
September 14, 2009
By Rob Glickman

Rob Glickman presents his Top 10 tips to improving your on-court game …

September 6, 2009
By Carl Barnett
It has recently been discovered that an un-swallowed taste of replacement drink versus placebo can spike the performance of one athlete over another. The anticipation of fuel can stimulate the areas of the brain which appear to have allowed their muscles to work even harder.