March 16, 2010
By Branislav Grujic
Psychological skill training is based on fundamental assumption; athletes try to do the best they can given their physical limitations and learning history, and they try to respond as effectively as possible in every situation.
March 2, 2010
By Branislav Grujic
Tennis development is a natural consequence of biomechanics. Biomechanics, stated simply, can be defined as the study of human motion in its physical entirety. It involves efficiency of movement and effectiveness in performing at the highest level, i.e., (by hitting the serve harder, or the approach shot deeper). To understand how your players develop coordinated skills, control, consistency, placement and power, it is important to consider the idea of a linked system of body segments.
February 16, 2010
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff
The Long Island tennis community is blessed to have some of the best indoor facilities and best coaches in the world right here in our backyard. Recently, Long Island Tennis Magazine spoke with some of these top coaches to get insight into their coaching/training strategies, what they look for in a great player, views on important local tennis topics, and a background in how they got into coaching. Even the best coach can always learn an extra tip or two, and the following article will provide all players and coaches with a chance to learn from the best.
January 1, 2010
By Carl Barnett
Have you ever had a complete meltdown? I mean, the type where you forget who is there, what was said, and basically, even forget many of the details of what has happened. By now, the entire world saw Serena Williams’ episode with the line judge at the U.S. Open women’s semifinal on Sept. 12.
January 1, 2010
By Steven Kaplan

While tennis coaches work from a similar body of knowledge, they tend to differ in how they prioritize and apply teaching methods, and philosophy. If a coach’s values compliment and reinforce a player’s values and the outlook of the player’s parents, then the relationship is probably a good fit. This month, I will address a narrow, but vital, coaching topic—learning. I have tried to simplify this complex area, by offering here, the headlines of my 20 favorite concepts on learning.

November 4, 2009
By Edward Wolfarth
Because I’ve put myself in an uncomfortable position utilizing a skill I'm not particularly good at, my expectations are commensurately less. I can easily rationalize my mistakes, but more importantly, I get to practice a weaker stroke
November 1, 2009
By Parsa Samii

As long as there has been sport, there has been coaching. Coaching is an occupation that requires several specific qualities that continue to evolve as a sport, and in this particular case, tennis, continue to change year after year. A great coach must be passionate, direct, knowledgeable, sincere, disciplined, motivational, and most importantly, trustworthy.

November 1, 2009
By Alanna Broderick
Over the past couple of years, I have noticed that a lot of my fellow tennis players against whom I competed are still involved in tennis in some form or another. Either, they are coaching at a university, working for a tennis club or coaching part-time somewhere.
September 20, 2009
By Steve Hu
Many junior players have powerful strokes in practice, but they can hardly bring them out effectively in real matches. One common reason is that they tend to take a brief “mental and/or physical break” after a good shot. They wait to see whether the ball is coming back, where it is coming, then start running. That often leads little or no time to set up, thus unable to bring out the lethal shots they “would have owned” when the coach feeds the balls from the basket.
September 14, 2009
By Rob Glickman

Rob Glickman presents his Top 10 tips to improving your on-court game …

September 6, 2009
By Carl Barnett
It has recently been discovered that an un-swallowed taste of replacement drink versus placebo can spike the performance of one athlete over another. The anticipation of fuel can stimulate the areas of the brain which appear to have allowed their muscles to work even harder.
September 1, 2009
By Steven Kaplan

The biggest fear of many tournament players that I have encountered is of “choking” or performing poorly due to the emotional and mental strain of a match. Indisputably, there is a strong psychological component to breaking down and choking, and while so-called mental weakness is a contributing factor to this problem, I would like to address the often overlooked non-psychological solutions to choking.

July 1, 2009
By Steven Kaplan

In the 30-plus years since I first began coaching tennis, society has seen many changes in the way people communicate and interact. Technology has not, however, altered basic human nature, and in this example, the inevitability of self-serving, immediate gratification-seeking behavior of junior players, coaches and parents. Many aspects of the system of junior tennis seem to encourage short-sighted behavior. Tennis is a highly competitive and clearly defining individual sport.

July 1, 2009
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff
Using The 1/3 Rule for drilling and competing: Competition allows you to work on shot selection, tenacity and focus. Drilling allows you to concentrate on pure execution of a particular skill (volley, serve, approach shot, etc.). Both drilling and competing are necessary to improve your game.
July 1, 2009
By Carl Barnett

Through my years as a tennis professional, I have found a bounty of benefits in pairing a student's private lessons and group work with tennis specific physical training. After what we've seen over the last decade in professional tennis, its effectiveness should come as no surprise.

July 1, 2009
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff
For those who think being a tennis coach is easy … think again! Being a tennis coach is a full-time job in which, on top of the obvious time spent practicing, there are countless additional hours spent with parents and college coaches. Then, of course, there’s also the tournaments and travel. One coach who takes these responsibilities very seriously is Mike Kossoff.
July 1, 2009
By Happy Bhalla
Conventional wisdom amongst many coaches and players suggests that the key to mental “toughness” is to talk and think positively at all times; especially when it comes to match play. While this seems to make sense at first glance, let us examine and explore a little beneath the surface.
July 1, 2009
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff
Robert Glickman, a USPTA pro for the last 30 years on Long Island, recently took his lessons on the road to Sans Souci Resort in Jamaica.
May 9, 2009
By Carl Barnett
Pros use a simple method to volley the ball. You can do the same. This is not diving or figure skating, so additional points are not gained for degree of difficulty.
May 1, 2009
By Edward Wolfarth
I cannot figure out why some of my students just don’t get it. I’m telling them everything I know, I’m trying different images and drills and they still do not seem to improve. One day on the other court, I was observing a fellow teaching pro giving a lesson. In a half-hour time span, he said very little. As a matter of fact, he didn't say anything technical or noteworthy. “Good shot, way to go, that's not it,” seemed to be his repertoire, but the student was still improving at a rate not much different than my student … what’s up? Certainly, I give my students feedback as well. After many years of trying different teaching techniques, I’ve come to the conclusion that there is little that can be taught but much that can be learned through self-discovery. And that’s the gist of it! I’ve evolved in to a “learning facilitator.” This may seem nothing more than a connotation distinction, but definitively, an important one.
May 1, 2009
By Steven Kaplan

While there are many ways to perform successful tennis hitting movements, there are underlying commonalities that unify and define them all. I would call these universal stroke production characteristics “fundamentals.” These fundamentals are based on the static and immutable laws of physics, mechanics, kinesiology and motor learning. If your strokes adhere to the demands of the aforementioned principals, you are likely to succeed. There are also variations that occur in the production of movements. They involve a different way to achieve the same important goal. I would call these variations “style.”

March 1, 2009
By Jared Rada

Are pee wee tennis players better athletes than pee wee football players? Are they stronger then soccer and basketball players?

March 1, 2009
By Edward Wolfarth

Multi-tasking (MT) is now the mantra of our generation. It is indiscriminately accepted not only in colloquial conversation, but among astute teachers and scholars. It is empowering. According to this widely-held axiom, our students can and do learn efficiently doing several things at once. Our younger (and perhaps hipper) students brag about their prowess at juggling many tasks at once, while us older folk bemoan our inability to master this mind-muddling aptitude … MT. After all, who can't walk and chew gum at the same time?

March 1, 2009
By Steven Kaplan

The ancient Roman playwright, Terence wrote: “Moderation in all things.” He could have been referring to optimum tennis performance. Often, I hear both players and instructors repeating phrases of tennis wisdom that, while partially true when applied in the right context, can be undermining of performance when misused. I will address three of these erroneous clichés here.