July 1, 2009
By Steve Haar

In a departure from previous years and an acknowledgement of the popularity of the Rally Day format, this year will see both a Suffolk County and a Nassau County Rally Day event.

July 1, 2009
By Steven Kaplan

In the 30-plus years since I first began coaching tennis, society has seen many changes in the way people communicate and interact. Technology has not, however, altered basic human nature, and in this example, the inevitability of self-serving, immediate gratification-seeking behavior of junior players, coaches and parents. Many aspects of the system of junior tennis seem to encourage short-sighted behavior. Tennis is a highly competitive and clearly defining individual sport.

July 1, 2009
By Carl Barnett

Through my years as a tennis professional, I have found a bounty of benefits in pairing a student's private lessons and group work with tennis specific physical training. After what we've seen over the last decade in professional tennis, its effectiveness should come as no surprise.

July 1, 2009
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff
World TeamTennis (WTT) is tennis like you’ve never seen it, featuring the biggest names in the world playing together in an innovative co-ed team format that offers exciting possibilities for players, fans and communities. The 10-team league was co-founded by Billie Jean King in the early 1970s.
May 18, 2009
By Jared Rada

The United States Tennis Association Eastern Section, in conjunction with the USTA Long Island Regional Board and local pros and volunteers, has been promoting tennis in local schools by introducing students to the new QuickStart Tennis USTA program.

May 1, 2009
By Bruce Forrest

I’ve been playing tennis for 34 years. I truly enjoy the game. Every time I step on to the court, it brings me back to my junior tennis years and I feel like a kid again. I wrote this article not to be critical, but as an observation on how the sport of tennis is losing its traditional values.

May 1, 2009
By Alan Fleishman

“Hey, coach.” I remember the first time I heard it. It sounded strangely ominous. I was a Social Studies teacher at John F. Kennedy High School in Bellmore, N.Y. My first few years there, I would go out and hit with the team; coaching was a whole new world.

May 1, 2009
By Dan Dwyer

If there is one thing that all tennis professionals agree on it must be “look at the ball.” We all try to get our students to understand that from the very first lesson. However, most students truly do not understand the depth of the concept of “looking at the ball.” Along came Roger Federer and it was obvious that he had perfected the skill. Hundreds of photographs and stop-action videos show how his head is still down looking at the spot where the ball met the racquet, even though the ball has already left the strings of his racquet.

May 1, 2009
By Steven Kaplan

While there are many ways to perform successful tennis hitting movements, there are underlying commonalities that unify and define them all. I would call these universal stroke production characteristics “fundamentals.” These fundamentals are based on the static and immutable laws of physics, mechanics, kinesiology and motor learning. If your strokes adhere to the demands of the aforementioned principals, you are likely to succeed. There are also variations that occur in the production of movements. They involve a different way to achieve the same important goal. I would call these variations “style.”

May 1, 2009
By Jim Dileo

You have seen the commercials promoting membership in the United States Tennis Association with the tagline “Join a team and have the opportunity to play for a national title.”

May 1, 2009
By Alanna Broderick

Orisen Swett Marden once said, “All men who have achieved great things have been great dreamers.” When I was a young girl, I had a dream of becoming a successful tennis professional. I used to see myself walking up to the net after winning match point against Steffi Graff no less, and shaking her hand. I used to practice my “thank you” speeches in my bathroom mirror. I had it all planned out. I dreamt of becoming the most famous Jamaican athlete ever born. Unfortunately, Usain Bolt beat me to the punch, but that’s a different story.

May 1, 2009
By Dr. Len Fazio

When thinking about what we will wear to our next tennis practice session or match, we are usually concerned with the comfort and style of our athletic apparel. After all, keeping comfortable during a workout is easily accomplished with all the moisture-wicking fabrics available to us today. And looking good while doing it … well, that’s a bonus! Both stylish and functional, tennis apparel has come a long way since the days of all-cotton, all-whites. So while we go to great lengths (and expense!) to purchase our outerwear and underwear, how many of us consider some “inner” wear? Inner-armour, as I like to call it, can also be stylish and functional. It can protect against injury, and for some players, actually enhance their performance on the court. This often overlooked piece of apparel is essential for virtually every sport. Of course, I’m talking about athletic mouth guards.

March 1, 2009
By Michael Jappell CRPC

Most of us have heard the saying: “Don’t put all of your eggs in one basket.” For years, financial experts have urged investors to spread their money across different types of asset classes—such as stocks, bonds and cash—in order to help reduce risk and enhance long-term returns.

March 1, 2009
By Rich Hume

The Tennis Association of Farmingdale (TAF) is an adult tennis league providing its members the opportunity to play outdoor competitive tennis during the months of May through September. TAF is comprised of seven ladders, men’s and women’s singles and doubles, mixed-doubles, and men’s and women’s senior (50 and over) singles. TAF operates under a ladder format, whereas you always have a range of 20 players to challenge to a match. This format ensures that players will naturally gravitate toward others of their own ability level.

March 1, 2009
By Jared Rada

Are pee wee tennis players better athletes than pee wee football players? Are they stronger then soccer and basketball players?

March 1, 2009
By Clark D. Ruiz II

The dilemma that faces many tennis families today, after spending nine to 10 years on the junior tennis circuit running from tournament to tournament is, “How do we find the right college for our child?” Ask most young junior tennis players where they want to go to college, and the majority will answer: Stanford, Duke, U Penn or some other top flight university. While those schools usually do have spots to fill on their tennis teams, varying in number from year to year, realistically, they need a player who fits a certain set of criteria. It is that criteria that keeps most junior tennis players from consideration.

March 1, 2009
By Edward Wolfarth

Multi-tasking (MT) is now the mantra of our generation. It is indiscriminately accepted not only in colloquial conversation, but among astute teachers and scholars. It is empowering. According to this widely-held axiom, our students can and do learn efficiently doing several things at once. Our younger (and perhaps hipper) students brag about their prowess at juggling many tasks at once, while us older folk bemoan our inability to master this mind-muddling aptitude … MT. After all, who can't walk and chew gum at the same time?

March 1, 2009
By Jennifer Kellner

This edition of Long Island Tennis Magazine takes you inside the trip and journey of Hauppauge, N.Y. high school student Jenny Kellner and her recent trip to Tucson, Ariz. for the 2009 Copper Bowl Tennis Tournament. Jennifer is a full-time student at Hauppauge High School. She is enrolled in a number of advanced placement courses and maintains her position on the high honor roll. She has been ranked as high as number one in the Eastern Section and number four nationally in the Girls 16 & Under. Currently, Jennifer is ranked 60th nationally in the 18 & Under age division and continues to advance in the standings. Jennifer hopes to find a college that is challenging both athletically and academically, and is looking forward to studying medicine. At this time, she works ardently to improve and reach her utmost tennis capabilities.

March 1, 2009
By Steven Kaplan

The ancient Roman playwright, Terence wrote: “Moderation in all things.” He could have been referring to optimum tennis performance. Often, I hear both players and instructors repeating phrases of tennis wisdom that, while partially true when applied in the right context, can be undermining of performance when misused. I will address three of these erroneous clichés here.

March 1, 2009
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff
Tennis has certainly become a global sport, but it is disappointing to see its leading country, and one of that country’s largest markets, having lost some high-profile events from both the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) and Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) tours. New York has lost a couple of professional tournaments that were very popular in the tennis community, both on Long Island and in the Metropolitan area.
January 1, 2009
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff

Long Island Tennis Magazine recently had the opportunity to chat with Jenna Poczic and Jennifer Colton of the 8th grade girls tennis team from Thompson Middle School in Syosset, N.Y. Jenna and Jennifer shared their insights on the sport of tennis and took a look forward to their future in the sport.

January 1, 2009
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff

Proudly representing the Association of Tennis Professionals, Merrick, N.Y.-native Scott Lipsky recently took a break from giving opponents service ace-induced whiplash and enlightened Long Island Tennis Magazine on the man behind the racket.

January 1, 2009
By Barry Kubit

Should I play on my high school varsity tennis team? Should I play USTA Regional, Sectional and National tournaments? Should I try to do both?

January 1, 2009
By Danny Burgess

In 1975 at the age of two, Phil Stevanovic, a construction manager who builds airports in the metropolitan area, was diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis, a degenerative genetic disease that affect the lungs and digestive systems. At the time, doctors told him he wouldn’t live past 18 years of age. With the assistance of medication and extensive chest physical therapy, Phil was able to beat the odds. Doctors prescribed lots of exercise as a way to clear the lungs of the thick sticky mucus that is the breeding ground for lung infections and the hallmark of Cystic Fibrosis.