November 1, 2009
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff
November 1, 2009
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff

Directory anyone looking to take a nice tennis vacation in the US or abroad.

November 1, 2009
By Steve Haar
November 1, 2009
By Bill Mecca

For many years, there has been a friendly rivalry between the Garden City Casino and the Cold Spring Valley Club. These two tennis clubs have been playing home and away matches for bragging rights. This year, the Casino’s interclub squad captain Rich Antoneck asked if the last interclub match of the year could be a charity event.

September 27, 2009
By Emilie Katz

When it comes to style, tennis has an advantage over other sports. The athletes are not hidden behind uniforms, helmets or padding. Instead, tennis players are given the freedom to wear whatever they like. At this year’s U.S. Open (Aug. 31-Sept. 13), Adidas will dress many of the top players in gear that combines state-of-the-art performance fabrics, along with unique cutting-edge style.

September 1, 2009
By Dana Blasucci

I’m not well-known throughout the Long Island tennis world. In fact, I think it’s safe to say that I’m hardly known at all. Some tennis players who frequent Carefree Racquet Club in North Merrick know me by name, but most know me simply as “the girl behind the desk.”

July 11, 2009
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff

The following products represent just a few of the hottest new trends and accessories to hit the court this spring and summer.

July 1, 2009
By Bruce Forrest
It was 1978, and the U.S. Open was coming to Flushing Meadows. My friend was a ball boy the previous year at Forest Hills and said, “Why don't you try out this year.” I said, “Sign me up!”
July 1, 2009
By Brad Shafran
When walking around the Flushing Meadows grounds during the U.S. Open, oversized yellow tennis balls are almost as ubiquitous as great forehands and flashy backhands. Nearly every kid in attendance (and even some adults) carries these large tennis balls, hoping to have the players adorn their signatures to its felt. As I learned at a young age, an autograph provides a tangible connection between the fan and the player, freezing a moment in time forever.
July 1, 2009
By Dr. David Scheiner
July 1, 2009
By Dr. Len Fazio
Traditionally, sport dentistry has served to treat and prevent oral-facial athletic injuries and related diseases and manifestations. However, this injury/disease-focused treatment may be limited in its ability to allow the athlete to fully realize his or her healthy potential. The holistic sports dentist is concerned not only with injury prevention and treatment, but is also aware of the direct or indirect impact that routine dental materials and procedures have on the athlete’s mental and physical states.
July 1, 2009
By Dan Dwyer
In the early 1980s, I received a phone call while in the middle of a staff meeting. The caller was requesting to enter a men’s tournament. Being rather busy at the moment, I told him that I would transfer his call to the tournament director. He interrupted by saying that he had a potential problem. I asked what the problem was and he told me that he was in a wheelchair. I must admit that I was a little taken aback and told him that I didn’t have time right then to discuss it with him, but that if he liked, I would hit some balls with him the next day as long as he understood that I would be very honest and upfront about what I thought the possibility of someone playing in a wheelchair was. He agreed and we met the next morning at Point Set Indoor Racquet Club. John Johnson showed up on time in an unusual wheelchair and we went on to the court.
May 1, 2009
By Dan Dwyer

If there is one thing that all tennis professionals agree on it must be “look at the ball.” We all try to get our students to understand that from the very first lesson. However, most students truly do not understand the depth of the concept of “looking at the ball.” Along came Roger Federer and it was obvious that he had perfected the skill. Hundreds of photographs and stop-action videos show how his head is still down looking at the spot where the ball met the racquet, even though the ball has already left the strings of his racquet.

May 1, 2009
By Danny Burgess
Only in America … Only in the United States of America could a poor African-American man born in New Orleans in 1901 rise to blow rhythmic sounds called jazz, entertaining stars, royalty, presidents and a Pope. Louis Armstrong’s unique style of playing earned him the nickname “Satchmo.” In the late 1970s, Satchmo moved to a small neighborhood in Queens where he eventually died, but not before leaving us a legacy of musical genius such as “What a Wonderful World” and “Dream a Little Dream of Me.” To honor his memory, America built him a stadium, right in his backyard, at the world’s richest tennis venue. In 1978, the Louis Armstrong Stadium became the main stadium at the U.S. Open, seating more than 18,000 people.
March 1, 2009
By Michael Jappell CRPC

Most of us have heard the saying: “Don’t put all of your eggs in one basket.” For years, financial experts have urged investors to spread their money across different types of asset classes—such as stocks, bonds and cash—in order to help reduce risk and enhance long-term returns.

March 1, 2009
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff
Tennis is a game which brings people together. However, there are many children who will never have the opportunity to play the game due to limited economic resources. Zachary Mintz and his twin sister, Paige, two high school sophomores, founded Tennis Racquets for Kids Inc. Both Paige and Zachary are avid tennis players and compete in many United States Tennis Association local and national junior tournaments. Over the last several years, they have accumulated a number of racquets that they had outgrown and were taking up space in their garage. They realized that these racquets were in very good condition and could provide a wonderful opportunity for children who could not afford to buy tennis racquets. In addition, they thought that other players would also have extra racquets lying around with no purpose. This concept became the inspiration for the creation of Tennis Racquets for Kids Inc., a non profit tennis charity that collects racquets that are no longer being used and redistributes them to children or organizations that need them. What a great way to help others and at the same time, be kind to the environment by recycling!
January 1, 2009
By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff
Stop World Hunger Tennis Tournaments For nearly 30 years, the Stop World Hunger Tennis Tournaments have been played on Long Island. The impetus of this effort began with the work of a very nice and charitable man by the name of Matt Swit of Amityville, N.Y. Matt used to be a marathon runner who would sell his miles and donate the money to Catholic Charities, who in turn, used the money to feed hungry children around the world.