| By Steve Annacone
When I was growing up, we were always taught to keep the ball deep. The idea was to push your opponent back and give them very few opportunities to move forward. These days, there are a lot of players who start the point standing relatively deep in the court. This pretty much negates the "hit the...Read more
  | By Steven Kaplan
All parents want what is best for their child, and some believe that being an active part of their child's development during tennis lessons is the best path to ensure success. In contrast, other parents choose to sit at arm’s length and trust the process by being passive during lessons. Undeniably...Read more
Novak Djokovic came back from two sets down to reach the French Open quarterfinals on Monday.
  | By Long Island Tennis Magazine Staff
It was an exciting day of tennis in Paris at the 2021 French Open as top-seed Novak Djokovic was nearly upset by Italy’s Lorenzo Musetti. But Djokovic overcame the young Italian and advanced with a 6-7(7), 6-7(2), 6-1, 6-0, 4-0 (ret.) victory. “After I lost the second set and went out to change and...Read more
  | By Steve Annacone
I’m sure we have all experienced having a great practice session only to find ourselves in a match struggling with the very same shots we hit well in practice. Even though you have executed these shots successfully in practice, it is a whole different world when you are trying to win a match. Your...Read more
  | By Chris Lewit
The forehand has become the premier dominant shot in modern tennis, especially in the men’s game. Toni Nadal, the legendary Spanish coach, even goes so far as to describe the forehand as “the most important shot in the game.” Most coaches and players would probably disagree with Uncle Toni, and...Read more
  | By Steve Annacone
Thinking on the court should be simple and concise. Play every single point the best that you can. You cannot win every game point, or every critical point; you have to keep giving yourself chances. If you had one chance, you need another. If you had a couple, you need three, etc. You need to think...Read more
  | By Steve Annacone
It is human nature to try to figure out what went wrong when you miss a shot on the tennis court. Most of us would be better off approaching things a different way. The first step is to identify if the miss was caused by the opponent hitting a good shot. If this is the case, it is best just to move...Read more
  | By Steve Annacone
Players tend to think that having more time will help them hit a better shot. Many players actually let the ball drop from close to an optimum position before making contact. I believe that too much time can cause many problems for players. Timing, indecision, and having to hit the ball up to clear...Read more
  | By Steve Annacone
Many tennis players tend to "steer" the ball in the direction that they want it to go. This involves changing your swing so that it goes more towards your target. Most of the work is done by your hands and your racquet. It is much better if you can use your shoulders to direct the ball. Try to...Read more
  | By Steve Annacone
I am a firm believer in focusing on your strengths during a tennis match. You can always get better at hitting the ball, improving a specific shot, and sharpening your technique. However, you want to hit your best shots when you are playing a match. If your forehand is better than your backhand,...Read more